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Archive for the ‘Magnetics’ Category

Abstraction in Situation Calculus Action Theories

Thursday, January 12th, 2017

Monday January 23, 2017 at 12:00 p.m. Bita Banihashemi, PhD Candidate in Computer Science at York University, will be presenting “Abstraction in Situation Calculus Action Theories”.

Speaker: Bita Banihashemi
PhD Candidate, Computer Science
York University

Day & Time: Monday, January 23, 2017
12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Location: Room TRS2164, 575 Bay Street (entrance at 55 Dundas Street West), Ryerson University

Contact: Maryam Davoudpour

Organizer: WIE, Magnetics, Measurement/Instrumentation-Robotics

Abstract: We develop a general framework for agent abstraction based on the situation calculus and the ConGolog agent programming language. We assume that we have a high-level specification and a low-level specification of the agent, both represented as basic action theories. A refinement mapping specifies how each high-level action is implemented by a low-level ConGolog program and how each high-level fluent can be translated into a low-level formula. We define a notion of sound abstraction between such action theories in terms of the existence of a suitable bisimulation between their respective models. Sound abstractions have many useful properties that ensure that we can reason about the agent’s actions (e.g., executability, projection, and planning) at the abstract level, and refine and concretely execute them at the low level. We also characterize the notion of complete abstraction where all actions (including exogenous ones) that the high level thinks can happen can in fact occur at the low level.

Biography: Bita Banihashemi is currently a PhD candidate in Computer Science at York University. Her research is primarily focused on agent supervision, which is a form of control/customization of an agent’s behavior. Her research interests include Knowledge Representation and Reasoning, Autonomous Agents and Multi-agent Systems, and AI and the Web.

Health Informatics Evening at Centennial College

Saturday, November 12th, 2016

Wednesday November 16, 2016 at 5:30 p.m. Igor Sirkovich, Vikki Leung, Karim Keshavjee and Jimmy Poulin, will be presenting “Health Informatics Evening at Centennial College”.

Speakers & Agenda: 5:15 to 5:30 Event Registration

1. Igor Sirkovich from 5:30 PM to 6:00 PM
Founder and CEO of Xpertera
HL7 FHIR and eHealth Architecture Consultant at Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care
Presentation title: Current initiatives at the Ministry of Health and eHealth Ontario, pan-Canadian standards collaborative, and health informatics standards (HL7 FHIR), Xpertera introduction.

2. Vikki Leung from 6:00 PM to 6:30 PM
Full Stack Developer at Interdev Technologies Inc.
Presentation title: Technology used for Community Paramedic Services, Interdev Technologies

3. Karim Keshavjee, MD from 6:30 PM to 7:00 PM
CEO of InfoClin Inc.
Adjunct Professor at University of Toronto, University of Victoria
Visiting Scholar at Ryerson University
Associate Member at Centre for Evaluation of Medicine, McMaster University
Numerous publications on Health Informatics studies and medicine
Presentation title: Health Apps by Design: A reference architecture for mobile apps for health

4. Jimmy Poulin from 7:00 PM to 7:30 PM
Director of Operations at m-Health Solutions
Presentation title: ECG signal remote collection via mobile wireless external recorder and smartphone.

5. NSERC speaker (name will be announced later) from 7:30 PM to 8:00 PM
Presentation: Funding opportunities for College Students in Science and Technologies programs.

8:00 to 8:30 PM Networking

Day & Time: Wednesday, November 16, 2016
5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Location: Room L1-02, Centennial College, Progress Campus
941 Progress Ave., Toronto, Ontario, M1G 3T8
Map: http://www.centennialcollege.ca/about-centennial/contact-us/campus-locations/

Organizers: IEEE Toronto WIE, Nicoleta Zouri
IEEE Toronto WIE, Magnetics, Measurement/Instrumentation-Robotics, Maryam Davoudpour

Registration: Registration is free, but space is limited. Please register via email to Nicoleta Zouri

Abstract: Offered as part of the Experiential Learning process for students in Health Informatics Program at Centennial College, this event facilitate skills and knowledge transfer between audience and speakers through an interactive session. Digital health solutions will be discussed and software demos will be presented.

Digital Health Initiatives at eHealth Ontario

Monday, November 7th, 2016

Friday November 11, 2016 at 11:30 a.m. Hosna Sedghi, Project Manager at eHealth Ontario, will be presenting “Digital Health Initiatives at eHealth Ontario”.

Speaker: Hosna Sedghi, MSc, PMP
Project Manager, eHealth Ontario

Day & Time: Friday, November 11, 2016
11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Location: Room A3-21, Centennial College, Progress Campus
941 Progress Ave., Toronto, Ontario, M1G 3T8
Map: http://www.centennialcollege.ca/about-centennial/contact-us/campus-locations/

Organizers: IEEE Toronto WIE, Nicoleta Zouri
IEEE Toronto WIE, Magnetics, Measurement/Instrumentation-Robotics, Maryam Davoudpour

Registration: Registration is free, but space is limited. Please register via email to Nicoleta Zouri

Abstract: eHealth Ontario was established by the provincial government in September 2008 as an independent agency of the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. eHealth Ontario is enabling physicians and health care providers to establish and maintain electronic health records (EHRs) for all of Ontario’s 13 million residents.

Biography: With a background in software engineering Hosna Sedghi has worked as a project manager at eHealth Ontario for the past 3 years and as a project lead previous to that. Hosna has extensive experience with HL7 standards, business analysis, system analysis, integration, and health information.

Who Are We Studying in Social Media: Bots or Humans?

Friday, November 4th, 2016

Thursday November 24, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. Dr. Anatoliy Gruzd, Associate Professor of Ted Rogers School of Management and Canada Research Chair in Social Media Data Stewardship, will be presenting “Who Are We Studying in Social Media: Bots or Humans?”.

Speaker: Dr. Anatoliy Gruzd
Associate Professor
Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University
Canada Research Chair in Social Media Data Stewardship

Day & Time: Thursday, November 24, 2016
12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Location: Room ENG 288, George Vari Centre for Computing and Engineering, 245 Church Street
Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, M5B 2K3
Map: http://www.ryerson.ca/maps – Look for ENG

Organizers: IEEE Toronto Systems Chapter, Alexei Botchkarev
IEEE Toronto WIE, Magnetics, Measurement/Instrumentation-Robotics, Computer Science Department of Ryerson University
Maryam Davoudpour

Registration: Registration is free, but space is limited. Please register via http://tinyurl.com/systemsChapterEvent24

Abstract: Researchers studying various online and computer-mediated communities used to be able to argue that the online is an extension of the offline, and that offline and online are just different slices of real life. But the increasing number of bots in our datasets and the increasing use of algorithmic filtering by social media giants are widening the gap between online and offline, and between computer-mediated and algorithm-driven communication. This in turn makes some online data less reliable, at least for those of us studying human behavior. It also begs the question, if we are using data from social media for modelling, are we modelling human behavior in social media or simply reverse engineering how bots and other algorithms operate? Therefore, there is an urgent need to better understand the nature of bots and algorithmic filtering, and their influence on users’ online interactions, not just from a computational, but also from sociological perspective. This talk will discuss some of the key challenges and possible solutions to detecting social bots in the context of conducting social media research.

Biography: Dr. Anatoliy Gruzd is a Canada Research Chair in Social Media Data Stewardship, Associate Professor in the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University. He is also the Director of the Social Media Lab and a co-editor of a multidisciplinary journal on Big Data and Society published by Sage. Dr. Gruzd’s research initiatives explore how the advent of social media and the growing availability of social big data are changing the ways in which people communicate, collaborate and disseminate information and how these changes impact the social, economic and political norms and structures of modern society. Dr. Gruzd and his lab are also actively developing and evaluating new approaches and tools to support social media data analytics and stewardship.

His research and commentaries have been reported across Canada and internationally in various mass media outlets such as Foreign Affairs, Los Angeles Times, Nature.com, The Atlantic, The Globe and Mail, The National Post, The Canadian Press, CBC TV, CBC Radio, CTV and Global TV.

Operational-Log Analysis for Big Data Systems: Challenges and Solutions

Monday, October 24th, 2016

Friday November 18, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. Dr. Andriy Miranskyy, Assistant Professor at the Department of Computer Science, Ryerson University, will be presenting “Operational-Log Analysis for Big Data Systems: Challenges and Solutions”.

Speaker: Dr. Andriy Miranskyy
Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science, Ryerson University

Day & Time: Friday, November 18, 2016
12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Location: George Vari Centre for Computing and Engineering
Ryerson University
Room: ENG 288
245 Church Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
Map – http://www.ryerson.ca/maps – Look for ENG

Registration: Registration is free, but space is limited. Please register via this link: http://tinyurl.com/systemsEvent

Organizers: IEEE Toronto Systems Chapter, Alexei Botchkarev albot@ieee.org
IEEE Toronto WIE, Magnetics, Measurement/Instrumentation-Robotics and Computer Science Department of Ryerson University
IEEE Toronto WIE Chair: Maryam Davoudpour maryam.davoudpour@ieee.org

Abstract: Big data systems (BDSs) are complex, consisting of multiple interacting hardware software components, such as distributed compute nodes, networking, databases, middleware, business intelligence layer, and high availability infrastructure. Any of these components can fail. Finding the failures’ root causes is extremely laborious. Analysis of BDS-generated logs can speed up this process. The logs can also help improve testing processes, detect security breaches, customize operational profiles, and aid with any other tasks requiring runtime-data analysis.

However, practical challenges hamper log analysis tools’ adoption. The logs emitted by a BDS can be thought of as big data themselves. When working with large logs, practitioners face seven main issues: scarce storage, unscalable log analysis, inaccurate capture and replay of logs, inadequate log-processing tools, incorrect log classification, a variety of log formats, and inadequate privacy of sensitive data. This talk describes the challenges and practical solutions faced while building and institutionalizing dynamic analysis tools in the industry.

Biography: Andriy Miranskyy is an assistant professor at the Department of Computer Science, Ryerson University. His research interests are in the area of mitigating risk in software engineering, focusing on software quality assurance, program comprehension, software requirements, project risk management, Big Data, and Green IT. Andriy received his Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics at the University of Western Ontario. He has 17 years of software engineering experience in information management and pharmaceutical industries. Prior to joining Ryerson, Andriy worked as a software engineer in the IBM Information Management division at the IBM Toronto Software Laboratory; currently, he is the Faculty Fellow of the IBM Centre for Advanced Studies. He has served as Guest Editor for a special edition of IEEE Software as well as organizer, committee member, and reviewer for several software engineering workshops and conferences.

Algorithms and Ethics

Friday, October 14th, 2016

Monday October 31, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. Dr. Richard Lachman, Associate Professor, will be presenting “Algorithms and Ethics”.

Speaker: Dr. Richard Lachman
Associate Professor, Digital Media in RTA School of Media

Day & Time: Monday, October 31, 2016
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Location: KHE 225, 340 Church Street, Ryerson

Contact: Maryam Davoudpour

Organizer: WIE, Magnetics, Measurement/Instrumentation-Robotics, Computer Science Department of Ryerson University

Abstract: Software algorithms are becoming more and more influential on the daily lives of citizens. Netflix, Spotify, Facebook, and Google openly discuss their use of algorithms as part of their operations, and mainstream critics have discussed the effects of filter-bubbles and echo-chambers on our points of view. However, algorithms are increasingly embedded in governmental and legal systems – with mathematical models influencing everything from teacher evaluations to police dispatch locations, and even parole board hearings. Algorithms exert their influence over our social, political, legal, financial, and educational systems, with average citizens and politicians having little understanding of how computation affects the conventions, laws, and assumptions that underlay our society . What are the responsibilities of computer scientists and software engineers towards an ethical practice as algorithmic decision-making becomes integrated into policy?

Biography: Dr. Richard Lachman directs Zone Learning for Ryerson University, Research Development for the Faculty of Communication and Design, and the Experiential Media Institute (formerly the Transmedia Research Centre). He is an Associate Professor, Digital Media in the RTA School of Media, and also serves as a Technology and Creative Consultant for entertainment and software-development projects. Dr Lachman completed his doctorate at UNE (Australia) studying software recommendation-engines, did his undergraduate work in Computer Science at MIT, and holds a masters degree from the MIT Media Lab’s “Interactive Cinema” group. His work with the Petz artificial-life software has over 3 million units shipped worldwide, his later transmedia projects have garnered a Gemini, CNMA and Webby Honouree awards, and he has lead projects with UNICEF, TIFF, Penguin UK, Kobo, CTV, the Discovery Channel Canada, the Banff Centre for the Arts, and the CRTC. His areas of research include virtual reality, transmedia storytelling, digital documentaries, augmented/locative experiences, mixed realities, and collaborative design thinking.

Blackberry’s Platform for True End-to-End Mobile Security for Healthcare

Friday, October 14th, 2016

Wednesday October 19, 2016 at 10:30 a.m. Sara Jost, Registered Nurse working at Blackberry as a Global Healthcare Industry Lead, will be presenting “Blackberry’s Platform for True End-to-End Mobile Security for Healthcare”.

Speaker: Sara Jost
Registered Nurse
Global Healthcare Industry Lead, Blackberry

Day & Time: Wednesday, October 19, 2016
10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Location: Centennial College Progress Campus, Room A3-17

Contact: Maryam Davoudpour, Nicoleta Zouri

Organizer: WIE, Magnetics, Measurement/Instrumentation-Robotics

Abstract: Blackberry is the one platform for true end-to-end mobile security. Together with our partners, Blackberry has developed secure mobile solutions for healthcare organizations across the continuum of care. From clinics, to hospitals, to first responders, home care workers and the home, we offer tried and true solutions that maximize patient outcomes and improve the patient experience, reduce costs and are fully secure to protect PHI.

1. We have helped hospitals reduce their emergency room wait times by 50% and meet their code STEM window 100% of the time.

2. In home care, we have shown drastic reductions in missed visits and savings of more than $7,000 per home care worker per year.

3. Blackberry secure messaging has improved efficiency so much that hospitals staff have saved 2 hours per day just by eliminating the need to track down other team members.

Biography: Sara Jost is a Registered Nurse working at Blackberry as a Global Healthcare Industry Lead where she leads the promotion of digital devices for use in medicine. Previously Sara worked as a Registered Nurse at Sunnybrook Hospital.

Using and Evaluating Gamification as a Strategy of Engagement in the Classroom

Monday, September 19th, 2016

Monday October 17, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. Dr. Sergio A. A. Freitas, Associate Professor in the Gama Engineering College at the University of Brasilia, will be presenting “Using and Evaluating Gamification as a Strategy of Engagement in the Classroom”.

Speaker: Dr. Sergio A. A. Freitas
Associate Professor, Gama Engineering College, University of Brasilia
Coordinator of Research, FGA Software Factory Laboratory

Day & Time: Monday, October 17, 2016
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Location: KHE 225, 340 Church Street, Ryerson

Contact: Maryam Davoudpour

Organizer: WIE, Magnetics, Measurement/Instrumentation-Robotics, Computer Science Department Ryerson University

Abstract: The gamification of activities other than games has become one of the main goals of a new research topic. In the education area the proposal could not be different: the new generations entering the higher education has a lot of experience in the virtual information environment and games. So, nothing more natural than checking the adherence of gamification to teaching this new student profile. In this scenario, this talk presents a case study of a gamification for a discipline of an undergraduate course. The gamification space was built based on a framework that stands on basic human motivations. Finally, I present some statistical evaluations of the students’ engagement after the introduction of gamification in the classroom.

Biography: Sergio A. A. Freitas is currently an Associate Professor in the Gama Engineering College (FGA) at the University of Brasilia (UnB), Brazil. He is also the coordinator of research in the FGA Software Factory Laboratory. His current research projects focus on interdisciplinary studies and applications of learning methodologies on engineering undergraduate courses, and software engineering methodologies. Prof. Freitas areas of expertise include gamification, PBL, virtual learning environments in education and training, and software engineering methodologies. Dr. Freitas has coauthored journal publications, conference articles and book chapters in the aforementioned topics, and has coordinated and participated on many projects from various funding agencies CNPq, FAP-ES, FAP-DF, Cebraspe, and some Brazilian Federal Ministries.

Disaster Scene Reconstruction – Emergency Management Tool

Thursday, September 15th, 2016

Monday September 19, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. Dr. Alex Ferworn, Associate Chair and Graduate Programs Director at Ryerson University, will be presenting “Disaster Scene Reconstruction – Emergency Management Tool”.

Speaker: Dr. Alex Ferworn
Associate Chair and Graduate Programs Director, Ryerson University
Director, Program in Disaster and Emergency Management

Day & Time: Monday, September 19, 2016
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Location: Ryerson, KHE 225

Contact: Maryam Davoudpour

Organizer: WIE, Magnetics, Measurement/Instrumentation-Robotics, Computer Science Department Ryerson University

Biography: Prof. Ferworn received his PhD in Systems Design Engineering from the University of Waterloo, his MSc in Computing and Information Science from the University of Guelph and his B.Tech in Applied Computer Science from Ryerson University, where he is a faculty member in the Department of Computer Science, Associate Chair and Graduate Programs Director. He is also Director of a number of Certificate programs including the Program in Disaster and Emergency Management. Ferworn is an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Computing and Software, Faculty of Engineering at McMaster University. Prof. Ferworn has been collaborating with the USAR and CBRNe Response Team (UCRT) of the Ontario Provincial Police since 2005. He has worked extensively with USAR teams in Canada and the United States on a broad range of technology issues related to Computational Public Safety. He does not own a dog.

Wireless Power Transfer Systems: Current Issues and Future Opportunities

Thursday, September 8th, 2016

Monday September 26, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. Sheldon S. Williamson, Senior Member at IEEE, will be presenting “Wireless Power Transfer Systems: Current Issues and Future Opportunities”.

Speaker: Sheldon S. Williamson
Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Electric Energy Storage Systems for Transportation Electrification
Director, Smart Transportation Electrification and Energy Research (STEER) Group Advanced Storage Systems and Electric Transportation (ASSET) Laboratory
UOIT – Automotive Center of Excellence (UOIT-ACE)
Department of Electrical, Computer, and Software Engineering
Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science
University of Ontario – Institute of Technology

Day & Time: Monday, September 26, 2016
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Location: Ryerson, KHE 225

Contact: Maryam Davoudpour

Organizer: WIE, Magnetics, Measurement/Instrumentation-Robotics, Computer Science Department Ryerson University

Abstract: More recently, with the automotive market getting introduced to several EV models (Tesla, Leaf, Mitsubishi – for example), the need for charging them within cities, suburbs, and highways, has driven power electronics engineers towards innovative ideas to solve the future charging infrastructure problem. Plugged charging topologies have been investigated thoroughly in recent years, based on existing SAE J1772 standards for AC and DC charging, ranging from 1.5 kW to 50 kW. On the other hand, in the last five years or so, power supply and charger manufacturing companies have been seriously started looking at wireless charging as an attractive solution, to avoid physical drawbacks of wired or plugged versions of charging EVs. The high-level goals of this seminar is to focus on introducing advanced power electronics solutions for charging traction batteries and ultracapacitors using wireless technologies. Both inductive power transfer (IPT) as well as capacitive power transfer (CPT, electrostatic) techniques of wireless charging will be introduced. The major market for IPT-based wireless charging is the mass transit industry, such as electric trains, buses, and trams, in the range of 10-50 kW, while both IPT and CPT could be used for charging small utility- grade EVs (golf carts/security vehicles), in smaller sizes of 1.0 kW.

Critical issues, such as IPT transfer coil design, CPT capacitor dielectric medium/transfer plate designs, and converter topologies, will be discussed. Detailed results of finite element analysis (FEA) designs for energizer and pick-up coils will be presented. Specific emphasis is placed on reducing the effect of skin effect and proximity effect for both in-motion and static charging (for varied switching frequencies and air-gap lengths). An important aspect that will also be covered is the design of charger topologies on the secondary side of the IPT or CPT system. The challenge is to come up with 1-stage power conversion techniques, including high-frequency (HF) AC/DC rectification and DC/DC charger functionalities, with conversion efficiencies of 95% or larger.

This seminar will be particularly useful for engineers with entry-level and medium-level knowledge of power electronics and energy storage systems for electric transportation.

Biography: Sheldon S. Williamson (S’01–M’06–SM’13) received his Bachelors of Engineering (B.E.) degree in Electrical Engineering with high distinction from University of Mumbai, India, in 1999. He received the Masters of Science (M.S.) degree in 2002, and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree (with Honors) in 2006, both in Electrical Engineering, from the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL. From June 2006 to June 2014, Dr. Williamson held a tenure-track Assistant Professor position, followed by a tenured Associate Professor position in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, at Concordia University, in Montreal, Canada. Dr. Williamson currently holds an Associate Professor position in the Department of Electrical, Computer, and Software Engineering, at the University of Ontario-Institute of Technology (UOIT), in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada. Since July 2015, Dr. Williamson also holds the prestigious title of NSERC Canada Research Chair in Electric Energy Storage Systems for Transportation Electrification. Dr. Williamson’s research interests include transportation electrification, electric energy storage systems, automotive power electronics, and motor drives. Dr. Williamson is a Senior Member of the IEEE and a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society.