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History of Technological Innovation: The First Revolution in Information Technology

Friday, September 22nd, 2017

Thursday October 26, 2017 at 5:30 p.m. Ken Bousfield, Partner at Bereskin & Parr LLP, will be presenting “History of Technological Innovation: The First Revolution in Information Technology”.

Day & Time: Thursday October 26, 2017
5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Speaker: Ken Bousfield, B.A.Sc., LL.B
Partner at Bereskin & Parr LLP

Location: Sidney Smith Hall, Room 1074
University of Toronto
100 St. George Street, Toronto, M5S 3G3

Contact: Emanuel Istrate

Organizers: IEEE Toronto Engineering and Human Environment Chapter in collaboration with the Impact Centre at the University of Toronto

Abstract: Using the invention of the printing press as a starting point, this fast-paced presentation traces technological developments in the spread of information, and the larger economic consequences flowing from that development.

More than five hundred years ago, an inventor in the information technology sector saw a business opportunity in an unmet economic need. The IT start-up he founded became an agent of profound change. The obstacles encountered by the inventor continue to face IT start-up ventures today.

The rapid spread of printing transformed the process of accumulation, organisation, preservation and dissemination of knowledge. It had, and still has, effects on every field of human endeavour, whether in commerce, education, science and engineering, or arts and literature. This presentation discusses the pre-existing technology, the change in technology, the further changes driven by the original innovation, and the effects of that technological change.

Join us for an entertaining, thought-provoking presentation that identifies important lessons for innovation in a knowledge-based society.

Biography: Ken Bousfield, P.Eng., LL.B (Toronto); B.A. Sc. (Mech. Eng., Waterloo) is a partner at Bereskin & Parr, a firm specializing in Intellectual Property Law. He has been a patent lawyer for 23 years. He has had a life-long interest in the history of technological innovation.

Molecular Communication in Mobile Systems

Friday, September 15th, 2017

Tuesday September 26, 2017 at 3:00 p.m. Professor Robert Schober, Institute for Digital Communications, will be presenting “Molecular Communication in Mobile Systems”.

Day & Time: Tuesday September 26, 2017
3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Speaker: Professor Robert Schober
Institute for Digital Communications
Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany

Location: Room BA 2165
Bahen Centre for Information Technology
40 St George St, Toronto, ON M5S 2E4

Contact: Arin Minasian

Organizers: IEEE Communications Society

Event Link: https://events.vtools.ieee.org/m/47028

Abstract: Molecular communication (MC) is an emerging research area offering many interesting and challenging new research problems for communication engineers, biologists, chemists, and physicists. MC is widely considered to be an attractive option for communication between nanodevices such as (possibly artificial) cells and nanosensors. Possible applications of the resulting nanonetworks include targeted drug delivery, health monitoring, environmental monitoring, and “bottom-up” manufacturing.

In this talk, we give first a brief introduction to MC and nanonetworking. The main focus of the talk is on stochastic channel modelling for mobile MC systems where the transmitter and/or receiver are not fixed but move subject to diffusion and flow. Metrics such as the mean, autocorrelation function, and probability density function of the channel impulse response will be investigated and the notion of coherence time in MC is introduced. Subsequently, the implications of time-variant channels for MC system design are studied, and corresponding channel estimation and non-coherent detection schemes are developed. The talk concludes with a summary of potential topics for future work.

Biography: Robert Schober (S’98, M’01, SM’08, F’10) was born in Neuendettelsau, Germany, in 1971. He received the Diplom (Univ.) and the Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the Friedrich-AlexanderUniversity of Erlangen-Nurnberg (FAU), Germany, in 1997 and 2000, respectively. From May 2001 to April 2002 he was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Toronto, Canada, sponsored by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). From 2002-2011, he was a Professor at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, Canada. Since January 2012 he is an Alexander von Humboldt Professor and the Chair for Digital Communication at FAU. His research interests fall into the broad areas of Communication Theory, Wireless Communications, and Statistical Signal Processing.

Dr. Schober received several awards for his work including the 2002 Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Award of the German Science Foundation (DFG), the 2004 Innovations Award of the Vodafone Foundation for Research in Mobile Communications, the 2006 UBC Killam Research Prize, the 2007 Wilhelm Friedrich Bessel Research Award of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, the 2008 Charles McDowell Award for Excellence in Research from UBC, a 2011 Alexander von Humboldt Professorship, and a 2012 NSERC E.W.R. Stacie Fellowship. In addition, he received several best paper awards. Dr. Schober is a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the Engineering Institute of Canada. From 2012-2015 he served as Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Communications. He is currently the Chair of the Steering Committee of the new Communication Society (ComSoc) journal IEEE Transactions on Molecular, Biological and Multiscale Communication and serves on the Editorial Board of the Proceedings of the IEEE. Furthermore, he is a Member-at-Large of the Board of Governors and a Distinguished Lecturer of ComSoc.

Molecular Bringing Precision to Measurements for Millimeter-wave 5G Wireless: Conducted and free-field modulated-signal measurements

Friday, September 15th, 2017

Wednesday September 27, 2017 at 12:00 p.m. Dr. Kate A. Remley from Wireless Systems Group, NIST, will be presenting “Molecular Bringing Precision to Measurements for Millimeter-wave 5G Wireless: Conducted and free-field modulated-signal measurements”.

Day & Time: Wednesday September 27, 2017
12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. (Light lunch will be served)

Speaker: Dr. Kate A. Remley
Wireless Systems Group, NIST

Location: Room BA 4287
Bahen Centre for Information Technology
40 St George St, Toronto, ON M5S 2E4

Contact: Arin Minasian

Organizers: IEEE Communications Society

Event Link: https://events.vtools.ieee.org/m/47045

Abstract: At millimeter-wave frequencies and for wide modulation bandwidths, the hardware performance of both modulated-signal sources and vector receivers becomes increasingly nonideal. These nonidealities make test and validation of devices, circuits and systems not only more important, but also more difficult. This is especially true because future systems will likely push the limits of modulation complexity and bandwidth to increase data throughput. We will discuss calibration and measurement techniques to correct millimeter-wave modulated-signal measurements illustrating that traditional assumptions at microwave frequencies may not be adequate at millimeter-wave frequencies.

Biography: Kate A. Remley (S’92-M’99-SM’06-F’13) was born in Ann Arbor, MI. She received the Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Oregon State University, Corvallis, in 1999. From 1983 to 1992, she was a Broadcast Engineer in Eugene, OR, serving as Chief Engineer of an AM/FM broadcast station from 1989-1991. In 1999, she joined the RF Technology Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO, as an Electronics Engineer. She is currently the leader of the Metrology for Wireless Systems Group at NIST, where her research activities include development of calibrated measurements for microwave and millimeter-wave wireless systems, characterizing the link between nonlinear circuits and system performance, and developing standardized test methods for RF equipment used by the public-safety community.

Dr. Remley was the recipient of the Department of Commerce Bronze and Silver Medals, an ARFTG Best Paper Award, and is a member of the Oregon State University Academy of Distinguished Engineers. She was the Chair of the MTT-11 Technical Committee on Microwave Measurements from 2008 – 2010 and the Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Microwave Magazine from 2009 – 2011, and is the Chair of the MTT Fellow Nominating Committee.

On System-Level Analysis & Design of Cellular Networks: The Magic of Stochastic Geometry

Thursday, August 31st, 2017

Friday September 8, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. Professor Marco Di Renzo from Paris-Saclay University/CNRS, will be presenting “On System-Level Analysis & Design of Cellular Networks: The Magic of Stochastic Geometry”.

Day & Time: Friday September 8, 2017
10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

Speaker: Professor Marco Di Renzo
Paris-Saclay University/CNRS, France

Location: Room ENG288
George Vari Engineering Building (Intersection of Church & Gould)
Ryerson University
245 Church St, Toronto, M5B 1Z4

Contact: Alireza Sadeghian, Alex Dela Cruz

Organizers: Signals & Computational Intelligence Chapter

Abstract: This talk is aimed to provide a comprehensive crash course on the critical and essential importance of spatial models for an accurate system-level analysis and optimization of emerging 5G ultra-dense and heterogeneous cellular networks. Due to the increased heterogeneity and deployment density, new flexible and scalable approaches for modeling, simulating, analyzing and optimizing cellular networks are needed. Recently, a new approach has been proposed: it is based on the theory of point processes and it leverages tools from stochastic geometry for tractable system-level modeling, performance evaluation and optimization. The potential of stochastic geometry for modeling and analyzing cellular networks will be investigated for application to several emerging case studies, including massive MIMO, mmWave communication, and wireless power transfer. In addition, the accuracy of this emerging abstraction for modeling cellular networks will be experimentally validated by using base station locations and building footprints from two publicly available databases in the United Kingdom (OFCOM and Ordnance Survey). This topic is highly relevant to graduate students and researchers from academia and industry, who are highly interested in understanding the potential of a variety of candidate communication technologies for 5G networks.

Biography: Marco Di Renzo received the “Laurea” and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical and Information Engineering from the University of L’Aquila, Italy, in 2003 and 2007, respectively. In October 2013, he received the Doctor of Science degree from the University Paris-Sud, France. Since 2010, he has been a “Chargé de Recherche Titulaire” CNRS (CNRS Associate Professor) in the Laboratory of Signals and Systems of Paris-Saclay University – CNRS, CentraleSupélec, Univ Paris Sud, France. He is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Technology Sydney, Australia, a Visiting Professor at the University of L’Aquila, Italy, and a co-founder of the university spin-off company WEST Aquila s.r.l., Italy. He serves as the Associate Editor-in-Chief of IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, and as an Editor of IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS and IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS. He is a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society and IEEE Communications Society. He is a recipient of several awards, and a frequent tutorial and invited speaker at IEEE conferences.

Canadian Manufacturing Technology Show 2017

Tuesday, August 29th, 2017

September 25-28, 2017, the national Canadian Manufacturing Technology Show 2017 offers a diverse mix of live technology on display, with unrivaled keynotes, panel discussions and technical sessions. CMTS includes several signature networking events where the industry comes together to connect, share and celebrate manufacturing.

Day & Time: September 25-28, 2017
September 25: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
September 26: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
September 27: 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.
September 28: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Location: The International Centre
Mississauga (Toronto), ON, Canada

Register to Attend: http://cmts.ca/

An Introduction to Free-Field Measurements of Wireless Devices in Reverberation Chambers

Friday, August 25th, 2017

Wednesday September 27, 2017 at 4:00 p.m. Dr. Kate A. Remley, leader of the Metrology for Wireless Systems Group at NIST, will be presenting “An Introduction to Free-Field Measurements of Wireless Devices in Reverberation Chambers”.

Day & Time: Wednesday September 27, 2017
4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Speaker: Dr. Kate A. Remley
Metrology for Wireless Systems Group at NIST

Location: University College
15 King’s College Circle
Toronto, Ontario
Room: 179

Contact: George V. Eleftheriades

Organizers: EM & Radiation Chapter, IEEE Toronto

Abstract: When the antenna is integrated into the body of a wireless device, as it is for cell phones and many other portable devices, performance testing is typically done under free-field conditions. In this overview presentation, we will discuss free-field characterization of some key wireless-device parameters by use of reverberation chambers. We will discuss recent research and some of the issues related to the use of these chambers for testing devices that transmit modulated signals.

Biography: Kate A. Remley (S’92-M’99-SM’06-F’13) was born in Ann Arbor, MI. She received the Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Oregon State University, Corvallis, in 1999. From 1983 to 1992, she was a Broadcast Engineer in Eugene, OR, serving as Chief Engineer of an AM/FM broadcast station from 1989-1991. In 1999, she joined the RF Technology Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO, as an Electronics Engineer. She is currently the leader of the Metrology for Wireless Systems Group at NIST, where her research activities include development of calibrated measurements for microwave and millimeter-wave wireless systems, characterizing the link between nonlinear circuits and system performance, and developing standardized test methods for RF equipment used by the public-safety community.

Dr. Remley was the recipient of the Department of Commerce Bronze and Silver Medals, an ARFTG Best Paper Award, and is a member of the Oregon State University Academy of Distinguished Engineers. She was the Chair of the MTT-11 Technical Committee on Microwave Measurements from 2008 – 2010 and the Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Microwave Magazine from 2009 – 2011, and is the Chair of the MTT Fellow Nominating Committee.

Response of voltage source HVDC systems to DC-side faults, HVDC fault characterisation and DC protection options

Tuesday, August 22nd, 2017

Friday August 25, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. Prof. Stephen Finney of University of Edinburgh School of Engineering, will be presenting “Response of voltage source HVDC systems to DC-side faults, HVDC fault characterisation and DC protection options”.

Day & Time: Friday August 25, 2017
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Speaker: Prof. Stephen Finney
University of Edinburgh School of Engineering

Location: Bahen Centre, Room BA 7180
40 St George St, Toronto, ON M5S 2E4

Contact: Sanaz Kanani

Organizers: IAS & PELS Joint Chapter

Register: https://events.vtools.ieee.org/meeting_registration/register/45918

Agenda: 2:00 pm: Light Refreshment
2:10-2:50 pm: Presentation (40min)
2:50 pm – Q&A (20min)

Abstract: The emergence of high performance, high voltage, voltage source converters (VSC) such as the modular multi-level converter (MMC ) has resulted in increased deployment of voltage source HVDC transmission both for interconnection of AC networks and integration of remote and offshore renewable energy resources. The improved functionality and suitability for networked operation make VSC-HVDC attractive for future power networks. However, the low impedance of voltage source HVDC makes is highly susceptible dc faults, resulting in rapid collapse of system voltage and extreme over currents. For the majority of converter topologies, fault current cannot be controlled by the converter switching with the potential for high current flows in the anti-parallel diodes. Protection devices are, therefore, required to operate with sufficient speed to avoid device failure. In current point-point connections this may be achieved through shunt protection of converter diodes coupled with AC side fault clearance which must be activated at all VSC terminals.

There is growing interest in the exploitation of VSC-HVDC in multi-terminal configurations, with a number of large scale pilot projects. (For example the Zhoushan 5 terminal scheme).

Conductor faults in such VSC-HVDC networks will result in rapid network-wide voltage collapse and over currents. In these cases the application of proven point-point protection with AC fault clearance, whilst effective, will result in the loss of power flows at all converter stations. This may be avoided by the use of DC circuit breakers (DCCB), however implementation of such circuit breakers presents challenging compromises in speed, complexity and losses.

Biography: Prof. Stephen Jon Finney graduated with a Master’s degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering from Loughborough University in 1988. He worked for the (U.K) Electricity Council research Centre Laboratories before joining the Power Electronics research team at Heriot-Watt University in 1990, obtaining his PhD in 1994. In 2005 he transferred to the University of Strathclyde where he contributed to the formation of the power electronics, drives and energy conversion group. This research group now includes 4 academic staff, five postdoctoral research fellows and 14 postgraduate researchers. The group’s research spans power semiconductor devices, circuits and system level applications. His work in the area of power electronics has resulted in the supervision 15 PhD completions and publication of over 150 research papers with over 30 in IEEE Transactions.

During his time at Strathclyde Professor Finney has been responsible for developing research into the application of power electronic systems energy systems. Work in this field includes HVDC transmission, Multi-terminal HVDC, Renewable generator interface and Energy collection architectures. The group recently completed work on the European Union funded ‘Twenties’ program, a multi-partner project which investigated the use of HVDC for the integration of large scale wind generation. This work will be extended through a number of successor projects focusing on overcoming technical barriers to HVDC networks offshore wind integration.

Besides HVDC Professor Finney’s team is involved in a broad range of Power Electronics research which include work on High Voltage IGBT Modules and advanced gate drives and U.K China Collaboration on Power Electronic Devices for the Network Integration of Electric Vehicles.

Low Power Digital Equalization for High-Speed SerDes

Sunday, August 6th, 2017

Tuesday July 25, 2017 at 4:10 p.m. Dr. Masum Hossain, Assistant Professor at the University of Alberta, will be presenting “Low Power Digital Equalization for High-Speed SerDes”.

Day & Time: Tuesday July 25, 2017
4:10 p.m. – 5:10 p.m.

Speaker: Dr. Masum Hossain
Assistant Professor
University of Alberta

Location: Bahen Centre, room BA1180
40 St George St, Toronto, ON M5S 2E4

Contact: Dustin Dunwell

Organizers: Solid-State Circuits Society

Slides from Event: Low Power Digital Equalization for High-Speed SerDes

Abstract: High-speed signaling and Serdes architecture are evolving rapidly to accommodate higher data rates and higher insertion loss. Digital equalization is a natural progression to that tend where traditional analog equalization techniques are falling short to meet the performance demand of multilevel signalling. But digital equalization is also power consuming and mostly dominated by the analog to digital converters. This talk explores different power reduction techniques as well as higher information efficiency data converters to enable low power digital equalization at 10+ Gb/s in 65nm CMOS.

Biography: Masum Hossain received his Ph.D. at the University of Toronto in 2010. From 2008 to 2010 he worked for Gennum (now Semtech). From 2010 to 2013 he worked for Rambus. Since 2013 he joined faculty of engineering at University of Alberta. Masum won the best student paper award at the 2008 IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits (CICC) Conference. He also won Analog Device’s outstanding student designer award in 2010.

Engineering Employment Events

Saturday, August 5th, 2017

OSPE will be running Engineering Employment Events on September 14, 2017 and September 30, 2017. The September 14th E3 is in partnership with OACETT and will focus on recent grads, associates and individuals with EIT, P.Eng., C.E.T. and C.Tech. designations. The September 30th E3 is in partnership with Transport Canada and will focus on recent grads, associates and individuals with EIT and P.Eng. designations.

Thursday September 14, 2017 Session

Registration Link: https://www.ospe.on.ca/events#521/E3-EMP-0917
Time: 11:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.
Location: Parkview Manor, 55 Barber Greene Rd, Toronto.

Saturday September 30, 2017 Session

Registration Link: https://www.ospe.on.ca/events#911/TCE3-JSK-0930
Time: 9:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.
Location: Corporate Event Centre at CHSI – 5110 Creekbank Road, Mississauga, Ontario

Design Considerations for Power Efficient Continuous-Time Delta Sigma ADCs

Friday, August 4th, 2017

Tuesday August 8, 2017 at 4:10 p.m. Dr. Shanthi Pavan, Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, will be presenting “Design Considerations for Power Efficient Continuous-Time Delta Sigma ADCs”.

Recording of the Event: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5wB8uI08dYvbmtnQjJoclF0VW8/view?usp=sharing

Day & Time: Tuesday August 8, 2017
4:10 p.m. – 5:10 p.m.

Speaker: Dr. Shanthi Pavan
Professor of Electrical Engineering
Indian Institute of Technology, Madras

Location: Bahen Centre, room BA1230
40 St George St, Toronto, ON M5S 2E4

Contact: Dustin Dunwell

Organizers: Solid-State Circuits Society

Abstract: Continuous-time Delta-Sigma Modulators (CTDSMs) are a compelling choice for the design of high resolution analog-to-digital converters. Many delta-sigma architectures have been published (and continue to be invented). This leaves the designer with a bewildering array of choices, many of which seem to pull in opposite directions. Further, it is often difficult to make a clear comparison of various architectures, as they have been designed for dissimilar specifications, by different design groups, and in different technology nodes. This talk examines various design alternatives for the design of power efficient single-loop continuous-time delta sigma converters.

Biography: Shanthi Pavan obtained the B.Tech degree in Electronics and Communication Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras in 1995 and the Masters and Doctoral degrees from Columbia University, New York in 1997 and 1999 respectively. He is now with the Indian Institute of Technology-Madras, where he is a Professor of Electrical Engineering. His research interests are in the areas of high-speed analog circuit design and signal processing. Dr.Pavan is the recipient of many awards for teaching and research, including the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society Darlington Best Paper Award and the Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Award (from the Government of India). He has served as the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems: Part I – Regular Papers. He is a Fellow of the Indian National Academy of Engineering.