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IEEE U of T Energy Industry Mixer

Tuesday, January 15th, 2019

Thursday January 17th, 2019 at 6:00 p.m. IEEE University of Toronto Student Branch will be hosting the “IEEE U of T Energy Industry Mixer”.

Day & Time: Thursday January 17th, 2019
6:00 p.m. ‐ 7:45 p.m.

Speaker: Manu Sud
Manager at Ontario Ministry of Energy

Kurtis Martin-Sturmey
Utility Project Lead, METSCO Energy Solutions

Antonio Antonopoulos
Co-Founder, Isla Power

Maged Sami
Senior Manager, CarbonFree Technology

Nikola Dimiskovski
Prooject Analyst, Toronto Hydro

The panel discussion will be moderated by

Hugo Sanchez
Consultant, Alectra Utilities

Organizers: IEEE University of Toronto Student Branch

Location: SS 1072 Sidney Smith Hall
Toronto, Ontario

RVSP: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/ieee-uoft-energy-industry-mixer-tickets-53889770755

Abstract: If you are interested in pursuing a career within the energy industry, you don’t want to miss out on an event in collaboration with UTII (UofT Industry Insights) happening on January 17, 2019. Get to know the energy industry with our guest speakers. This event is especially valuable for those of you who are interested in the Energy industry.

Agenda:
6.00 p.m.: Registration
6.15 p.m.: Guest Speaker’s Presentation and Panel Discussion
7.45 p.m.: Networking (aka end of event)
*food and refreshments are provided*

IEEE Humber Winter Coding Sessions #1

Wednesday, January 9th, 2019

This is a series of programming sessions lead by instructor Andew Rudder designed to prepare our IEEE at Humber student branch for future coding challenges such as IEEE Xtreme. These sessions will be held at Humber College and will be interactive so please bring a laptop with you. Please join us for hot chocolate, donuts, and the sharing of coding knowledge.

Day & Time: Friday January 11th, 2019
5:10 p.m. ‐ 8:00 p.m.

Speaker: Andew Rudder
Secretary, IEEE at Humber Student Branch

Organizers: IEEE Toronto WIE, Humber Student Branch

Location: Humber College North Campus, Room F310

Contact: IEEE Humber

Making Canada a Nation of Innovators

Wednesday, January 9th, 2019

Tuesday January 22nd, 2019 at 12:00 p.m. the Licensing Executives Society, will be presenting “Making Canada a Nation of Innovators”.

Day & Time: Tuesday January 22nd, 2019
12:00 p.m. ‐ 2:00 p.m.

Speaker: Speakers from CIPO. TBD
Speakers from ISED. TBD

Organizers: Licensing Executives Society Toronto Chapter

Location: AutoDesk at MaRS
661 University Ave #200
Toronto, ON M5G 1M1

Register: https://les.informz.net/informzdataservice/onlineversion/ind/bWFpbGluZ2luc3RhbmNlaWQ9MjUwNzE4NSZzdWJzY3JpYmVyaWQ9Mzc4MDU0NzU4

Abstract: The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) and Canada’s Innovation Science and Economic Development (ISED) Office will jointly provide an informative presentation and discussion on the Government of Canada’s Innovation agenda. Learn how Canada’s Innovation and Skills Plan is putting bold ideas into action, including Canada’s IP Strategy, and Innovation Canada – a client centric, single window business innovation service.

A light lunch will be served.

Integrated Terrestrial/Aerial 6G Networks for Ubiquitous 3D Super-Connectivity in 2030s

Sunday, December 2nd, 2018

Thursday December 6th, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. Prof. Halim Yanikomeroglu, Carleton University, will be presenting a ComSoc distinguished lecture: “Integrated Terrestrial/Aerial 6G Networks for Ubiquitous 3D Super-Connectivity in 2030s”.

Day & Time: Thursday December 6th, 2018
2:00 p.m. ‐ 3:30 p.m.

Speaker: Prof. Halim Yanikomeroglu
Carleton University

Organizers: ComSoc IEEE Toronto

Location: Bahen Centre, Room BA1230
40 St George St, Toronto, ON M5S 2E4

Contact: ComSoc IEEE Toronto

Register: https://events.vtools.ieee.org/m/183175

Abstract: As the 5G standards are currently being developed with a scheduled completion date of late-2019, it is time to reinitiate a brainstorming endeavour followed by the technical groundwork towards the subsequent generation (6G) wireless networks of 2030s.

One reasonable starting point in this new 6G discussion is to reflect on the possible shortcomings of the 5G networks to-be-deployed. 5G promises to provide connectivity for a broad range of use-cases in a variety of vertical industries; after all, this rich set of scenarios is indeed what distinguishes 5G from the previous four generations. Many of the envisioned 5G use-cases require challenging target values for one or more of the key QoS elements, such as high rate, high reliability, low latency, and high energy efficiency; we refer to the presence of such demanding links as the super-connectivity.

However, the very fundamental principles of digital and wireless communications reveal that the provision of ubiquitous super-connectivity in the global scale – i.e., beyond indoors, dense downtown or campus-type areas – is infeasible with the legacy terrestrial network architecture as this would require prohibitively expensive gross over-provisioning. The problem will only exacerbate with even more demanding 6G use-cases such as UAVs requiring connectivity (ex: delivery drones), thus the need for 3D super-connectivity.

In this talk, we will present a 5-layer vertical architecture composed of fully integrated terrestrial and aerial layers for 6G networks of 2030s:

– Terrestrial HetNets with macro-, micro-, and pico-BSs
– Flying-BSs (aerial-/UAV-/drone-BSs); altitude: up to several 100 m
– High Altitude Platforms (HAPs) (floating-BSs); altitude: ~20 km
– Very Low Earth Orbit (VLEO) satellites; altitude: 200-1,000 km
– Geostationary Orbit (GEO) satellites; altitude: 35,786 km

In the absence of a clear technology roadmap for the 2030s, the talk has, to a certain extent, an exploratory view point to stimulate further thinking and creativity. We are certainly at the dawn of a new era in wireless research and innovation; the next twenty years will be very interesting.

Biography: Halim Yanikomeroglu is a Professor at Carleton University. His research covers many aspects of communications technologies with emphasis on wireless networks. He supervised 20 PhD students (all completed with theses). He coauthored 360+ peer-reviewed research papers including 120+ in the IEEE journals; these publications have received 11,000+ citations. He is a Fellow of IEEE, a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Communications Society, and a Distinguished Speaker for the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society. He has been one of the most frequent tutorial presenters in the leading international IEEE conferences (29 times). He has had extensive collaboration with industry which resulted in 25 granted patents (plus more than a dozen applied). During 2012-2016, he led one of the largest academic-industrial collaborative research projects on pre-standards 5G wireless, sponsored by the Ontario Government and the industry. He served as the General Chair and Technical Program Chair of several major international IEEE conferences.

IEEE Humber Programming Session #5 Fall 2018 Series

Thursday, November 29th, 2018

This is a series of programming sessions lead by instructor Andew Rudder designed to prepare our IEEE at Humber student branch for future coding challenges such as IEEE Xtreme. These sessions will be held at Humber College and will be interactive so please bring a laptop with you. Over the 6 weeks we will be practicing logic questions while learning new coding techniques from sorting to data structures. The sessions will also be open to questions and student ideas.

Day & Time: Friday November 30th, 2018
5:00 p.m. ‐ 8:00 p.m.

Speaker: Andew Rudder
Secretary, IEEE at Humber Student Branch

Organizers: IEEE Toronto WIE, Humber Student Branch

Location: Humber College North Campus, Room F312

Contact: IEEE Humber

Abstract:

Our next programming session is Friday November 30th, from 5pm – 8pm in room F312. Snacks will be served!

Last week we reviewed Link lists and the key differences & uses between Link-Lists and Arrays. We then covered vectors in depth. And then, we went further with stenography with a demonstration of an LSB bitmap encoder. Sample code for this encoder is located in week 4 of this google drive:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1JWns0X22mWdXAyJdGHH_pc0kRNG0pM12

This week we will continue exploring stenography, practice with vectors, and take a deeper look into strings.

The Qubit is the Transistor: Si-based Transistor and Analog-Mixed-Signal Circuit Scaling and the Natural Progression of Moore’s Law to Silicon Quantum Computing at the Atomic Scale

Thursday, November 29th, 2018

Monday December 17th, 2018 at 1:10 p.m. Dr. Sorin Voinigescu, Professor at the University of Toronto, will be presenting a SSCS distinguished lecture: “The Qubit is the Transistor: Si-based Transistor and Analog-Mixed-Signal Circuit Scaling and the Natural Progression of Moore’s Law to Silicon Quantum Computing at the Atomic Scale”.

Day & Time: Monday December 17th, 2018
1:10 p.m. ‐ 2:30 p.m.

Speaker: Dr. Sorin Voinigescu
Professor, University of Toronto

Organizers: SSCS IEEE Toronto

Location: Bahen Centre, Room BA1230
40 St George St, Toronto, ON M5S 2E4

Contact: Dustin Dunwell

Abstract: Quantum computing is a hot topic at very cool temperatures. Cool as in 10-100 mK.

Recently, a cold-atom physicist nonchalantly asked me the question: Why are you interested in high temperature quantum computers? High as in 4 -12 K. He was serious! Need I talk about Global Warming in such cool environments? Pluto is another option. Today, quantum computers consist of racks of microwave and analog-mixed-signal test equipment, FPGAs and feedback loops for error correction, long 50-Ohm coaxial cables, and a few qubits formed with non-linear Josephson-junction resonators, entangled through niobium superconducting λ/4 resonators at 8-20 GHz, biased by a DC magnetic field of up to 1 Tesla, and whose spin is controlled by an AC magnetic field rotating in the “lab frame”. Are you still spinning?

There’s talk of electrons as “microwave photons”, Larmor and Rabi frequencies, photon-to-spin entanglement, RAP (as in rapid adiabatic passage), Bloch sphere, tensors in n-dimensional Hilbert spaces, but also of OFDM, phase noise, I-Q up- and down- conversion, Gaussian pulse modulation, coherent π/2, π/4 spin phase rotations in azimuth and elevation. Qubits are logic gates and memory cells at the same time. Logic gate operations consist of synchronized microwave pulses applied sequentially to the same qubits. The only probabilistic part (need I mention Schrodinger’s cats Flip and Flop?) is readout, when the spin state is projected on the Z (DC magnetic field) axis!

In other words, quantum computing is about everything you learned and thought you’d never use again, should have learned, or you were never taught in undergrad and grad school in math, quantum and atomic physics, electronics, electromagnetics, and computer science…

This talk will first attempt to demystify and translate the physics of quantum computing to an electronics engineer jargon. Next, I will discuss the feasibility of high-temperature (2-4 K) Si and SiGe electron/hole-spin qubits and qubit integrated circuits (ICs) in commercial 22nm FDSOI CMOS technology, and explore their scalability through simulation to 2nm dimensions, when the coupling energy, ΔE, becomes comparable to thermal noise at 77-300 K.

Silicon electron-spin and hole-spin coupled quantum-dot (QD) qubits have attracted a lot of interest recently due to their potential for integration in commercial CMOS technology. However, like their more established superconducting cousins, to date, because of the low confinement and coupling energies (e.g. ΔE, in the tens of μeV range, comparable to the thermal noise level, kBT, at 100 mK) their operation has been restricted to temperatures below 100 mK. Moreover, since cryogenic systems cannot remove more than a few μW of thermal power at 100 mK, and the experimental laboratory (think TNC at U of T versus TSMC 7nm fab) technologies in which these qubits have been realized do not allow for fabrication of spin manipulation and readout circuitry, the latter reside on a separate chip, at 4 K or higher temperature. The lack of monolithic integration further degrades readout fidelity and computing speed because the atto-Farad capacitance, high-impedance qubit needs to drive 50Ω and 100x larger capacitance interconnect off- chip. A qubit with higher confinement and coupling energies, with spin resonance in the upper mm-wave region, will allow for higher temperature operation, alleviating these problems and enabling large-scale monolithic quantum computing processors. For example, a qubit operating at 4 K would require mode splitting energies of 0.25 meV which corresponds to a spin resonance frequency of 60 GHz and require a DC magnetic field of 2.5 T. Simplifying a bit, 240GHz spin-resonance frequencies and 9T magnetic fields should be adequate for 12K operation and 1.4 THz with an humongous magnetic field are needed for 77 K. You get the drift…
Finally, I will briefly review hot-off-the-press results obtained here at U of T. For the first time we report (i) integration of qubits and electronics on the same die, (ii) strained SiGe hole-spin and strained Si electron-spin FDSOI qubits on the same die, and (iii) propose a monolithic processor architecture which allows for short, 10-20ps spin control pulses and high Rabi frequencies, fRabi, to compensate for short spin phase coherence lifetime. We also demonstrate that, at 2 K, MOSFETs and cascodes can be operated as QDs in the subthreshold region while behaving as classical MOSFETs and cascodes in the saturation region, suitable for qubits and mm-wave mixed-signal processing circuits, respectively.

If we still have holiday time left, I will go through a tutorial example of how we can derive the specification for the mm-wave spin manipulation and readout circuits starting from the Hamiltonian and the measured I-V characteristics of our SiGe hole-spin qubits. I may touch on the impact of minimum-size (18nmx6nmx80nm) MOSFET ofset voltage and process variation on qubit characteristics, on spin manipulation and readout architectural options (low phase-noise radar, OFDM radio, low-noise, broadband, ultra-high-gain TIAs), mm-wave switch impact and OFDM sub-carrier spacing on qubit crosstalk and isolation…Or maybe we should leave that for New Years’.

R&D Essentials for Technology Companies

Thursday, November 29th, 2018

Wednesday January 23rd, 2019 at 4:30 p.m. IEEE Toronto Computer Chapter is hosting a “R&D Essentials for Technology Companies” event.

Day & Time: Wednesday January 23rd, 2019
4:30 p.m. ‐ 7:30 p.m.

Organizers: Computer Chapter, IEEE Toronto

Location: Bay Adelaide Centre (KPMGLLP)
333 Bay Street, Suite 4600
Toronto, ON M5H 4G3

Contact: Dennis Cecic, P. Eng., SMIEEE
Chair, IEEE Computer Society (Toronto Chapter)

Dennis Woo, P. Eng., SMIEEE, FEC
Senior Manager, Tax Incentives Practice, KPMG LLP

Register: RSVP is required for this event: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/rd-essentials-for-technology-companies-tickets-53069892477

Abstract: Does your business create or improve technologies?

Development of technology is costly and risky. You will want to know about the available bank services, government funding programs and how to protect your intellectual property.

Join us for an afternoon conversation on the following topics:

– Bank services designed to support technology companies.
– Government programs (e.g. SR&ED and IRAP) to support businesses conducting R&D.
– Intellectual property, trademarks and patents.

Experienced professionals from KPMG LLP, Prima IP, Royal Bank, and InvestOntario will present and answer your questions on these topics. Space is limited. Light refreshments will be served.

Rethink Cities – A FIDIC/EFCA White Paper on Sustainable Urban Development

Thursday, November 29th, 2018

Friday December 14th, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. Laleh Farhadi, MSc Urban and Regional Planning, will be presenting “Rethink Cities – A FIDIC/EFCA White Paper on Sustainable Urban Development”.

Day & Time: Friday December 14th, 2018
1:00 p.m. ‐ 2:00 p.m.

Speaker: Laleh Farhadi, MSc Urban and Regional Planning

Organizers: Magnetics Chapter, WIE IEEE Toronto

Location: Ryerson University, Victoria Building (VIC)
285 Victoria St., 7th Floor, Room 736 (conference room)
Toronto, Ontario M5B 1W1

Contact: Reza Dibaj

Abstract: Today, over half of the world’s population lives in cities covering 2- 3 % of the Earth’s land area, using 75 % of all energy and emitting 80% of all carbon dioxide. Infrastructure investments in many countries and cities are not at a desirable level or they are steered in the wrong direction while many cities are growing faster geographically than population-wise. Society has to rethink cities.

The FIDIC White Paper addresses the need of evolving resource efficiency in cities with increased focus on planning and making socially and economically attractive areas, well-functioning spatial structures and energy efficient systems.

To meet the increasingly complex challenges of cities, holistic and integrated approach is needed and rightly applied regarding emissions, climate, resilience, climate risks, flooding, biodiversity, energy and material use, improved quality of life and social responsibility.

Biography: Laleh Farhadi is an Urban Planner, internationally experienced in both private and public sectors on different types of plans and projects related to the city and its ongoing challenges.

During a project in Consulting Engineering Firm, while reviewing and providing feedback for a FIDIC White Paper called “Rethink Cities”, she faced the fact that the total built environment (not just the individual buildings) requires sustainable overall solutions that form synergies in solutions for society, buildings, infrastructure, and technical systems.

This presentation based on FIDIC/ EFCA White Paper is a step forward to this knowledge and responsibility sharing with the hope of professional cooperation among various effecting fields in the city.

Smart Connected Buildings Form the Foundation of Smart City: Today’s Possibility, Tomorrow’s Necessity

Monday, November 26th, 2018

Monday December 10th, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. Amir Shabani, Ph.D., P.Eng., Canada Industrial Research Chair (IRCC) in Smart Connected Buildings, will be presenting “Smart Connected Buildings Form the Foundation of Smart City: Today’s Possibility, Tomorrow’s Necessity”.

Day & Time: Monday December 10th, 2018
1:00 p.m. ‐ 2:00 p.m.

Speaker: Amir Shabani, Ph.D., P.Eng.
Canada Industrial Research Chair (IRCC) in Smart Connected Buildings

Organizers: Magnetics Chapter, WIE IEEE Toronto

Location: Ryerson University, Department of Computer Science, Room 288
George Vari Engineering and Computing Centre
245 Church Street Toronto, ON M5B 2K3

Contact: Reza Dibaj

Abstract: Have you ever been or worked in a space/classroom that the air was not fresh enough, too cold in the winter or too hot in the summer? Have you ever wondered why even a brand new LEED-certified building is not smart enough and does not let the occupants control their environment, in terms of temperature, lighting et cetera.

This presentation aims to provide some insights on the challenges the current industry of building automation is facing and the opportunities that the new advancement such as Internet of Things (IoT), Artificial Intelligence (AI), and Adaptive Machine Learning (AML) could bring to this industry to make buildings smarter and sociable. In the context of smart city, rather than buildings being primarily treated as loads, intelligent buildings play a significant role in saving energy and improving the comfort and productivity of the occupants; emphasizing the needs for buildings to be social: interact with occupants, share data with each other, learn from each other, and help each other.

Biography: Dr. Amir Shabani is the NSERC Industrial Research Chair (IRCC) in Smart Connected Buildings. He is the director of Intelligent Building Automation Systems (IBAS) lab at George Brown College, Toronto, where his research team is closely collaborating with industry leaders on deployment, assessment, and development of new technologies that make homes and buildings smarter and social.

IEEE Humber Programming Session #4 Fall 2018 Series

Wednesday, November 21st, 2018

This is a series of programming sessions lead by instructor Andew Rudder designed to prepare our IEEE at Humber student branch for future coding challenges such as IEEE Xtreme. These sessions will be held at Humber College and will be interactive so please bring a laptop with you. Over the 6 weeks we will be practicing logic questions while learning new coding techniques from sorting to data structures. The sessions will also be open to questions and student ideas.

Day & Time: Friday November 23rd, 2018
5:00 p.m. ‐ 8:00 p.m.

Speaker: Andew Rudder
Secretary, IEEE at Humber Student Branch

Organizers: IEEE Toronto WIE, Humber Student Branch

Location: Humber College North Campus, Room F312

Contact: IEEE Humber

Abstract:

This Friday, November 23 at 5pm, we will be having our 4th programming session. The session will be held in F312, in one of the hive rooms. Please let us know if you can attend.

Due to the popularity and interest in these sessions, we will be extending these sessions to 3 hours from now on. Last week we practiced with Link Lists but asked everyone to try and finish a complete link list with these functions by this Friday:

createNode
addFront
printList
AddLast
deleteFront
deleteLast

I attached a sample of a link list with only the first three functions. At the beginning of the next session we will answer any lingering link lists questions, and Andrew Rudder will go over the advantages and disadvantages of using a link list. Also, Robert Lengyel will be talking about vectors and strings. With our remaining time we will be continuing to explore steganography.

This Google drive link has all of the documents and coding files we utilized during the first 2 sessions.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1JWns0X22mWdXAyJdGHH_pc0kRNG0pM12