IEEE Toronto Section

IEEE

Hybrid Biomedical Optics Imaging and Instrumentation

Friday, February 16th at 12:15 p.m., Nima Tabatabaei, Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Director of Hybrid Biomedical Optics Laboratory at York University, will be presenting “Hybrid Biomedical Optics Imaging and Instrumentation”.

Day & Time: Friday, February 16, 2018
12:15 p.m. ‐ 1:15 p.m.

Speaker: Nima Tabatabaei
Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering
Director, Hybrid Biomedical Optics Laboratory
York University, Canada

Location: Room: ENG 210, George Vari Centre for Computing and Engineering
245 Church Street
Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3

Contact: Saba Sedghizade, Maryam Davoudpour

Organizer: WIE IEEE Toronto, IEEE Ryerson Student Chapter, Instrumentation-Measurement/Robotics-Automation, Magnetics, and Computer Science Department of Ryerson University

Abstract: The focus of professor Tabatabaei’s research is on the design and instrumentation of thermal and optical imaging technologies and devices with applications in medical diagnosis and screening. Optics-based medical devices are of particular interest to him due to their intrinsic ability of revealing malignancies in early stages. The early diagnosis of diseases improves the effectiveness of treatments, promotes prevention rather than medical intervention, and is probably the only approach for us to win the war on cancer. However, one of the major challenges in optical imaging of endogenous tissue contrast is the poor specificity due to background signals from healthy tissues. Professor Tabatabaei’s research vision is to overcome this shortcoming by separating excitation and detection channels using Hybrid methods. In this scenario, crosstalk between the channels, selectively, takes place by energy conversion at malignant sites that are sensitive to the excitation thus minimizing (if not eliminating) the signals originating form background health tissues.

Biography: Nima Tabatabaei is an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the director of Hybrid Biomedical Optics laboratory (http://www.HBOLab.ca) at the York University (Canada). He received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. in Materials Science and Engineering and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering (University of Toronto; 2012) before carrying out research at the Harvard Medical School and Wellman Center for Photomedicine as postdoctoral fellow. His research interests are design and development of hybrid biomedical optics imaging technologies for applications in early disease diagnosis and screening.

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