IEEE Toronto Section

IEEE

Algorithms and Ethics

Monday October 31, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. Dr. Richard Lachman, Associate Professor, will be presenting “Algorithms and Ethics”.

Speaker: Dr. Richard Lachman
Associate Professor, Digital Media in RTA School of Media

Day & Time: Monday, October 31, 2016
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Location: KHE 225, 340 Church Street, Ryerson

Contact: Maryam Davoudpour

Organizer: WIE, Magnetics, Measurement/Instrumentation-Robotics, Computer Science Department of Ryerson University

Abstract: Software algorithms are becoming more and more influential on the daily lives of citizens. Netflix, Spotify, Facebook, and Google openly discuss their use of algorithms as part of their operations, and mainstream critics have discussed the effects of filter-bubbles and echo-chambers on our points of view. However, algorithms are increasingly embedded in governmental and legal systems – with mathematical models influencing everything from teacher evaluations to police dispatch locations, and even parole board hearings. Algorithms exert their influence over our social, political, legal, financial, and educational systems, with average citizens and politicians having little understanding of how computation affects the conventions, laws, and assumptions that underlay our society . What are the responsibilities of computer scientists and software engineers towards an ethical practice as algorithmic decision-making becomes integrated into policy?

Biography: Dr. Richard Lachman directs Zone Learning for Ryerson University, Research Development for the Faculty of Communication and Design, and the Experiential Media Institute (formerly the Transmedia Research Centre). He is an Associate Professor, Digital Media in the RTA School of Media, and also serves as a Technology and Creative Consultant for entertainment and software-development projects. Dr Lachman completed his doctorate at UNE (Australia) studying software recommendation-engines, did his undergraduate work in Computer Science at MIT, and holds a masters degree from the MIT Media Lab’s “Interactive Cinema” group. His work with the Petz artificial-life software has over 3 million units shipped worldwide, his later transmedia projects have garnered a Gemini, CNMA and Webby Honouree awards, and he has lead projects with UNICEF, TIFF, Penguin UK, Kobo, CTV, the Discovery Channel Canada, the Banff Centre for the Arts, and the CRTC. His areas of research include virtual reality, transmedia storytelling, digital documentaries, augmented/locative experiences, mixed realities, and collaborative design thinking.

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